Aryan Skynet

Once Aryan Skynet Goes Live It Doesn't Matter Who Pulled The Switch

Tag Archives: sixties

White America Recognizes Itself in the Rhodesian Mirror

Concurrently with the ostensible threat from communist domino-toppling in Southeast Asia, American conservatives in the 1960s and 1970s found themselves preoccupied with developments in African countries undergoing decolonization. “For those … Continue reading

June 30, 2018 · 9 Comments

A “New Element” in Postcolonial Africa

Being the seeker after the obscure that I am, I’ve been perusing some Soviet commentaries on the politico-economic situations in various African countries during the 1960s, following ostensible independence from … Continue reading

June 24, 2018 · 10 Comments

Carl Jung’s Spooky Postwar Proto-Petersonism

Two years ago, an acquaintance handed me several books by Carl Jung, one of which was 1957’s The Undiscovered Self. Actually, apparently having forgotten that he had already given it … Continue reading

May 10, 2018 · 51 Comments

JFK, RFK, John Frankenheimer, and the Mystery of Sirhan Sirhan

The following material is excerpted from my recently published book, Protocols of the Elders of Zanuck: Psychological Warfare and Filth at the Movies. Sirhan Sirhan, the man who has been … Continue reading

April 14, 2018 · 14 Comments

The Sexual Revolution and the End of the Road

The following is an excerpt from my recently published book, Protocols of the Elders of Zanuck: Psychological Warfare and Filth at the Movies. As woman metamorphosed into a professional as … Continue reading

March 16, 2018 · 11 Comments

You Don’t Know How Lucky You Are, Boys

For most of a century, the partisans of the Soviet Union would make great bales of propaganda hay out of the treatment of blacks in the U.S.A. and other capitalist … Continue reading

March 8, 2018 · 57 Comments

Hip to the Moon: Brandon Adamson Drops Out to Conquer the Stars

Not counting high school and college reading assignments of several of William Shakespeare’s plays, I could probably count the books of poetry I’ve read with the digits on one of … Continue reading

February 15, 2018 · 21 Comments

Twilight of the Ayatollahs?

One of the developing stories setting the tone for 2018 is the outbreak late in December of unrest in Iran that mainstream news outlets CNN and Fox have attributed to … Continue reading

January 4, 2018 · 42 Comments

Was Portuguese Colonialism Really So Bad?

By the 1960s, when decolonizing “winds of change” were sweeping across the African continent, the Portuguese had maintained a presence in Angola for nearly 500 years and so considered their … Continue reading

November 26, 2017 · 26 Comments

Oppressed by Nostalgia: Was Ceausescu Right?

Earlier this week, being the unapologetic weirdo that I am, I watched and ended up thoroughly enjoying Andrei Ujica’s gloriously sprawling, three-hour documentary The Autobiography of Nicolae Ceausescu (2010), which … Continue reading

November 2, 2017 · 86 Comments