Aryan Skynet

Once Aryan Skynet Goes Live It Doesn't Matter Who Pulled The Switch

The Adult Conspiracy

In preparing for an eventual book review, I’ve been reading fellow Aryan Skynet author Ranier Von Kook’s Magnum Opus, “The Protocols of the Elders of Zanuk: Psychological Warfare and Filth at the Movies,” a sprawling and comprehensive history of of the movie business. At 500 plus pages, complete with extensive footnotes, I’ve only been skimming various parts and especially a entire chapter devoted to supposed “predictions” of the 9/11 attacks “hidden” – or not so hidden – in various Hollywood movies going back to the late 1970s.

A textbook example of a “conspiracy theory” the idea has a certain resonance with a couple of recent articles in White Nationalist publication Counter-Currents. First, a review of television mini-series “Waco” about the FBI raid on the Branch Davidian compound in 1993, coincidentally happening at precisely the same time as the first terrorist attack on the World Trade Center. The attack on Waco then becoming the supposed inspiration for the Oklahoma City Bombing, ostensibly committed by Timothy McVeigh and blamed on “White Nationalism” and even William Pierce’s novel “The Turner Diaries.”


Some “conspiracy theories” are official doctrine, such as the “conspiracy” of a world wide shadowy group of Muslims called “Al Qaeda” who were able to outwit the entire combined forces of the US defense and military intelligence establishment to hijack four airplanes and fly two of them into the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City, destroying both massive skyscrapers and then another 47 story building, WTC7, later that day.

The “official story” of 9/11 is itself a conspiracy theory – a conspiracy theory that many in the US establishment – and plenty of civilians – described as “like a Hollywood movie” at the time. But you won’t be called a “conspiracy theorist” for believing in the official conspiracy theory of 9/11 – you are only a “conspiracy theorist” if you do not believe the official conspiracy theory of 9/11. A simple example is, if you believe that 19 Muslims, inspired by their religion, were able to pull off the attack, that is NOT a “conspiracy theory” – but if you suggest that, instead, Zionist Jews with ties to Israel pulled off the attack, that makes you a “conspiracy theorist.”

Another Counter Currents article is a review of a recent book about the White Nationalist movement, titled, “Everything You Know Will Burn.” This book is written by a left-wing anti-White journalist from Norway who spent six years “embedded” in the so-called “far right” or “White nationalist” movement. It’s the story of a “white nationalist conspiracy” of supposedly radical, fringe, extremist anti-government conspirators who – unbelievably, like something out of a novel – nevertheless closely cooperate with not only anti-White, far left “journalists” from Norway, but literally have their supposed political enemies, like the SPLC, charged with “exposing them”, on speed dial.

Like something out of the movie The Departed, where the cops are infiltrated by the mafia, and the mafia infiltrated by the cops – or, perhaps a better analogy, like Animal Farm. The pigs are supposedly the enemies of the humans, until you peek through the window and see them wearing human clothes and walking on their two hind legs.

It almost makes one a little “conspiratorial” reading the open and unabashed accounts of “White Nationalist radicals” hanging out and drinking beer with the “anti-hate” SPLC, while literally posing for the cameras of the “Jewish media” they constantly call their enemy.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jun/04/national-socialism-neo-nazis-america-donald-trump

The concept of “conspiracy theories” reminds me of two large scale “conspiracies” I was involved in myself, in my teens and 20s.

In the 1980s there was a best selling, throw away series of fantasy paperbacks written by Pierce Anthony called the “Xanth” novels. A comedic tongue-in-cheek take on “sword and sorcery” fantasy fiction popular with White teenage boys, the series featured one long running gag called “The Adult Conspiracy.” The child characters in the novels were forever noticing adults – specifically pairs of men and women – clearly speaking “in code” about some sort of activity these grown-ups would engage in out of sight of the children. The kids were forever speculating about just what it was that these men and women were doing behind closed doors, an activity they clearly spent a lot of time engaging in, but would never discuss with the children, and would always answer evasively when directly questioned.

I began to engage in this “adult conspiracy” myself in my late teenage years, and it wasn’t just me. I could write – have written thousands of words about comical scenarios of us conspirators sneaking around at night, climbing in and out of bedroom windows, making clandestine plans, and never – or almost never – getting caught. When confronted by parents and other authority figures about our activities, we would brazenly, shamelessly, lie through our teeth. They say that “conspiracies” can’t happen because no one can keep a secret, but that’s clearly not true. I and my fellow conspirators didn’t even need to coordinate our lies, nor did we have to swear anyone to secrecy, it all came quite naturally because there was an alignment of interests. If any of us got caught, we would likely be prohibited from leaving the house, preventing us from engaging in our conspiratorial activities which, for us at the time, were more important than literally anything else except for perhaps food and water.

Even later, I and a number of friends and acquaintances began conspiring in another large scale, semi-secret activity – one in which the consequences of being caught were far more than some embarrassing lectures by parents or the loss of car driving privileges. Many of us – virtually my entire set of friends – began to engage in a vast conspiracy that involved the production, distribution, sale, and consumption of illegal narcotics.

The consequences of getting caught were possible prison time. Yet this didn’t even slow us down. And because we were well aware of the consequences, we naturally – without coordination, without any sort of grand plan – began to create a virtual “culture of conspiracy.” Speaking in code on the phone became second nature. At first, our codes were obvious, simple replacement ciphers we (wrongly, it turns out) thought would prevent the police (that we always assumed were listening to every phone call) from using against us in a court of law.

A quantity of illegal drugs became a count of “CDs.” Quantities of money were fractioned from hundreds and thousands of dollars to mere handfuls of change.

As time wore on and we became even more adept at deception, substitution ciphers became little more than a mutual understanding which, if overheard, would raise no suspicions at all.

“Hey what’s up?”

“Hanging out, you should come over.”

That was an invitation to pick up a pound of marijuana.

“What’s going on?”

“Nothing, I’m doing homework.”

That was the cancellation of a drug deal.

Good luck to the NSA spies and FBI agents with their fancy wiretaps proving any of that in a court of law!

Without any sort of grand plan, without any central controlling authority, we set up a sophisticated distribution network, often involving HUNDREDS of people, ferrying highly illegal drugs in cars, stashed in clever but obvious places. We used teenage girls as “mules” knowing that a pretty girl tends to be treated with kid gloves by police and could drive around visiting girlfriends without raising any sort of suspicions. The handful of times our co-conspirators were caught, red handed, lying to the police was second nature. No one had to be told “don’t squeal,” no one had to be told to be evasive, no one had to be told to be cryptic.

We even became quite talented at picking up social signals about who was likely to be “in on the conspiracy” with us. Styles of dress, types of music, jewelry, certain kinds of slang – it all spoke volumes.

Of course we weren’t as invisible as we thought either. There were plenty of people that did know exactly what we were up to, plenty of people who could also read the signs – the clothes, the music, the slang – but there was always just enough plausible deniability we tended to get away with it. The handful of times people were caught we simply chalked up to carelessness, or bad luck. Penalties were potentially severe – but usually not. No one would be doing hard time, more likely a humiliating court date, a hefty fine, and some urine tests and probation.

At a time when the official government had declared a “war on drugs,” at a time when every school in America had “just say no” programs, and at a time when civil liberties were being rolled back precisely to catch people engaged in exactly what we were doing – we shamelessly, without a second thought, engaged in a massive, decentralized, highly illegal “conspiracy” to break the law – and for the most part, got away with it.

According to the logic of those who “don’t believe in conspiracy theories” this should have been impossible. According to the logic of those who discount “conspiracy theories” about September 11, the Oklahoma City Bombing, or the last few decades of “Muslim terrorism” such grand scale conspiracies are simply impossible, by default.

Unless, that is, they are done by official enemies of the state. In the official rendering, Muslims can – and do – engage in large scale decentralized conspiracies. Muslims – but not Jews. In the official rendering, “white supremacists” like Timothy McVeigh and his collaborators at “Elohim City” can, and do, engage in conspiracies – but not “progressive” whites.

So the difference between an “official story” and a “crazy conspiracy theory” is not in the details of the planning nor the scale of the operation, but simply Lenin’s dictum, “Who? Whom?”

The “Muslim” 9/11 conspiracy is real, to question it is to, ironically, be a “conspiracy theorist.” The “white nationalist racist” conspiracy to commit Oklahoma City is real, to question it is to, ironically, be a “conspiracy theorist.” It’s “who, whom” – NEVER “what, when and how.”

To ask specific question about the Oklahoma city bombing – forensic questions about the types of bombs used – is a “conspiracy theory.” But fact-free speculations about a “vast right wing conspiracy” of “racists” to “bring down the government” with a truck full of fertilizer is, interestingly, “not a conspiracy theory.”

To ask basic physical questions about 9/11, the destruction of the three World Trade Center buildings or the damage at the Pentagon – even though those questions have zero to do with any sort of “conspiracy” – are, in fact, “conspiracy theories.” But positing a world wide “conspiracy” of Muslim fundamentalists with nearly super-human flying abilities after mere hours of training is “not a conspiracy theory.”

It’s astonishing, the twisting of the language. Forensic questions become “conspiracies” while actual narratives – without any sort of physical evidence – of elaborate conspiracies are “not conspiracies.”

As noted in Kook’s book, one of the official 9/11 Commission members actually said that 9/11 was “the product of a 30 year old conspiracy” – but to bring this up is, ironically, a “conspiracy theory.” To quote the official government report of a “30 year old conspiracy” is itself a conspiracy – but to posit that the entire Muslim world is engaged in a thousand year “conspiracy” against the West is “not a conspiracy.”

Of course, to suggest that Jews have engaged in a 100 year long conspiracy to conquer a small patch of real estate in Palestine is an “anti-semitic conspiracy theory.” Unless you are in favor of it, in which case it’s “recollections of the Zionist movement.”

So again, it all simply depends on “who, whom” – never “what, when, how.”

I suspect that if the writers at Counter Currents ever read von Kook’s book, they will immediately embrace the idea that Hollywood, the Jewish movie business, has essentially engaged in a decades long “conspiracy” to undermine the values of America – to promote anti-white attitudes, miscegenation, White guilt, Black victimhood, and sympathy for the Zionist entity and Jews in general.

Who knows, the writers at Counter Currents might even give von Kook his contention that Hollywood was promoting a narrative of “Islamic terrorism” intended to demonize Arabs and Muslims in the interest of promoting American wars against the enemies of the Zionist entity.

But von Kook’s speculation that Hollywood spent decades “preparing” America for a 9/11 style terrorist attack by Muslims? That the plan – radical Muslims flying airlines into the World Trade Center, specifically – was referenced numerous times during the “30 year conspiracy?”

Well, Counter Current’s reaction might be similar to a certain father’s reaction to finding condoms in his daughter’s purse before a date with her soccer playing high school boyfriend.

“She’s not PLANNING on having sex with him, she’s just PREPARING in case something happens.”

To suggest the young couple was PLANNING on engaging in sexual activity is a conspiracy theory – the Adult Conspiracy theory.

And we all know that conspiracy theories are just plain crazy.

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29 comments on “The Adult Conspiracy

  1. Pingback: The Adult Conspiracy | Hipster Racist

  2. icareviews
    March 12, 2018

    Reblogged this on icareviews and commented:

    Hipster Racist with a sneak peek at my book plus some ironic musings on the relevance of the “Who?” in “conspiracy theory” nomenclature.

    Like

  3. icareviews
    March 12, 2018

    Dude, don’t read the coolest part of my book first. That’s like having your pudding before you’ve eaten any meat.

    Like

    • bob saffron
      March 12, 2018

      I’m experimenting with positions for comfortably reading it in bed. It’s big enough to stab into the belly but cradling it is hard work.

      Like

      • icareviews
        March 12, 2018

        Sorry. I guess it’s more of a coffee table book? The way I sometimes read is while slumped in a chair placed next to my bed. I have the book spread open on the bed covers and lean over it to read, keeping a hand or two free to hold a snack or drink.

        Like

      • bob saffron
        March 12, 2018

        Like the greats Rumsfeld and Jefferson, I prefer reading standing, preferably from a screen. Little books come to bed. Yours is a fight.

        Like

  4. bob saffron
    March 12, 2018

    The OKC bombing had precedents. Similar physical dynamics and media/judicial handling.

    McVeigh, I believe, was an integral part of both the operation and shaping the public’s perception thereof. The baddie invariably gets to leave a flowery suicide note (Atta), appears on 60 Minutes (McVeigh), or has his own videocassettes mailed in (Bin Laden, the “strong horse” blah, blah, blah). His badness is fully fleshed out so as the rubes get it. “Subtle”, Hollywood just doesn’t do.

    Re: McVeigh’s death sentence: Didn’t his attorney write a book complaining his client did his best to frustrate the defense? And the execution had no independent witnesses, to my knowledge. One thing I do not understand is how McVeigh could go through the charade of an official execution and yet still be confidant of living past the clapperboard. Crooks’ honor, hmm.

    Like

    • Hipster Racist
      March 12, 2018

      Ranier’s work on OKC is fantastic. The entire counter-narrative that was attempted – the Iraq/Iran connection and a collaboration between “radical Muslims” and “White supremacists” – fell flat, but it WAS tried. They DID attempt to push that alternative narrative.

      It’s just gone down the memory hole now, the Israeli connection, the attempt at pressuring Clinton into a war against Iraq – something they did again via the “Wag the Dog” Monica Lewinsky scandal – I mean, it’s all there in black and white – including a “prophetic” Hollywood movie about just a scenario a month before. But it’s like it’s too complicated to wrap your head around, so people just chalk it up to “conspiracy theories.”

      One of the great scenes in Ranier’s book is all the Hollywood producers sharing their balconies at Carbon beach. You know these guy come up with “Wag the Dog” style plots over glasses of brandy as a matter of course.

      Another tidbit no one remembers – Paul Wolfowitz’ college roommate once did an interview pointing out that in university Wolfowitz and his friends were constantly discussing terrorist attacks – specifically involving Muslims hijacking planes and flying them into landmarks – and how such terrorism could affect the USA, the balance of power, sympathy for Israel, create an imperial presidency, etc.

      It was a hobby with these types. Again, it’s all there in black and white but no one wants to really let it sink in and consider what we’re dealing with.

      Frankly, this “movement” is of no help either. It’s full of tards who would rather fantasize about long dead fascist movements, prophesy a great collapse, parade around in uniforms or long for a “Man on a White Horse” who will show up and magically save us one day.

      Our enemies, on the other hand, make plans and figure out how to execute them. Their chutzpah gives them an advantage – I think Hitler himself pointed that out with his infamous “big lie” concept.

      Liked by 2 people

      • bob saffron
        March 12, 2018

        On drugs, informers, and conspiracies, “Ex New Yorker” has several comments about where the student loan bubble is going to take us. (H/T “T”).
        https://tinyurl.com/y8tpst7p

        Like

      • bob saffron
        March 13, 2018

        Here’s one you’ll like.

        Like

      • Hipster Racist
        March 13, 2018

        The only thing I know about that church is that they have a sculpture of the World Trade Center being destroyed that was placed there in … like 1986.

        There’s also a part featuring the Brooklyn Bridge being blown up, which was also a rumor and/or attempt – in fact, there are existing NYPD tapes, and NYT articles, saying that the cops actually pulled over a van loaded with explosives headed for the bridge.

        Part of that “30 year conspiracy” – the “prediction” that Muslims were going to fly airplanes into the WTC and blow up bridges has been a constant, regular talking point since the 70s.

        Liked by 1 person

      • bob saffron
        March 13, 2018

        Goes without saying that Satan will be a dude till the End Times, and then some.

        Like

    • Hipster Racist
      March 12, 2018

      Remember Kimberly Leto? She was a bartender at O’Donnell’s Pub in Baltimore. She was murdered by two black males in 2014. One of the black males who murdered her was the son of a police dispatcher.

      Holy shit – if that is the O’Donnell’s Pub on Charles Street – I’ve been there numerous times – in fact, just a few years ago when I visited with my ex back around 2013. That area is about as safe as it gets in Baltimore. If they are murdering White lady bartenders from O’Donnell’s it’s worse than I ever imagined.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. indravaruna
    March 13, 2018

    There is been a new false flag attack in Britain, just months before the Word Cup in Russia.

    Like

  6. BMan
    March 13, 2018

    Reblogged this on B'Man's Revolt and commented:

    The Hipster Racist expounds on Ranier Von Kook’s new book (I have purchased one, awaiting its delivery) discussing the dichotomy of “conspiracy theories” found in proper forums compared to people like me.

    Official stories are conspiracy theories issued by Big Brother which are embraced, but unbelievable, yet conspiracy theories by real conspiracy theorists are shunned while totally believable.

    Liked by 1 person

    • guest
      March 13, 2018

      The lesson is that it’s better to fool just 80% of the people, who then henpeck any unbelievers, all on their own with gusto, heck, they love a good witch hunt! This falls away without muh “freedom of speech”™. We here in eastern Europe didn’t even have a term such as conspiracy theory, because everyone knew the government was lying, nobody thought you were weird if you didn’t believe. While there was oppression, there was less pretending, because might made right.

      Like

  7. NoddingHead
    March 14, 2018

    Excellent essay.

    On rare occassions when I bring up 9/11 to selected friends, the normies usually shriek “someone would have talked!”. I jusy say, no, they won’t talk unless they want to be hung for treason and mass murder. It doesn’t seem to register with them, they still just point and shout “CONSPIRACY THEORIST”.

    Your drug sales days are very interesting. Did you ever take acid? I never did, thank God. But some friends did, unfortunately.

    Like

  8. NoddingHead
    March 14, 2018

    A close relative of a poweful Senator who was a good friend of Ronald Reagan while he was President gave me shit, called me a “pussy” because I refused to try acid. True.

    Like

    • Bob Bevis
      March 14, 2018

      You reminded me of a book called Scanner Darkly. The guy that wrote it used acid in the 1960s as a way to expand his mind. He was the only one of his friends that survived it.

      Like

  9. NoddingHead
    March 14, 2018

    I also see that Counter-Currents studiously ignores 9/11 and other false flags.

    Like

  10. NoddingHead
    March 14, 2018

    You mentioned Oklahoma City. General Partin, an expert in explosives. Part 1 of 2…..

    Watch “Brig Gen Ben Partin Lecture; Oklahoma City / Part 1 of 2” on YouTube

    Like

  11. Bob Bevis
    March 14, 2018

    So Heimbach as been arrested for battery of his wife and father in law in front of a minor. The story is a real life Hillbilly Shakespeare tragedy. I don’t know whether to feel sorry for the guy as he is an unemployed dude living in a caravan, or dismiss it as a show put on by the SPLC. “White Nats are toothless hillbillies, yo!”

    Like

    • Hipster Racist
      March 14, 2018

      TWP will finally disappear and those clown’s days of media celebrity are over. That’s great, I’ll never have to speak of them ever again.

      Let’s note one thing, however – the first thing Parrott did is call the SPLC and give them a statement.

      Like

      • Guest
        March 14, 2018

        That’s a mistake anyone could have made. He likely pressed the wrong button on his speed dial.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. james
    March 17, 2018

    Great post.

    Like

  13. NoddingHead
    March 31, 2018

    Part 2 of General Partin’s OK City presentation:

    Watch “Brig Gen Ben Partin Lecture; Oklahoma City / Part 2 of 2” on YouTube

    Like

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