Aryan Skynet

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November Third Is Irish Holocaust Remembrance Day

ireland

My ancestry is chiefly English, but that does nothing to change the sympathy I increasingly feel for the Irish, whose country was occupied for centuries by British forces working for oligarchical interests. Christopher Fogarty is the world’s foremost authority on the “Irish Potato Famine” – actually a genocidal project of intentional starvation perpetrated against the fair island people between 1845 and 1852 – and explores its significance in an engaging discussion with the impressively knowledgeable Tim Kelly, host of the always worthwhile podcast Our Interesting Times. Excepting some misrepresentation of Hitler, Fogarty makes a compelling case for revising our understanding of what we must honestly term the Irish Holocaust.

Rainer Chlodwig von K.

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About icareviews

Propaganda Minister of #AryanSkynet

18 comments on “November Third Is Irish Holocaust Remembrance Day

  1. icareviews
    November 2, 2016

    Reblogged this on icareviews.

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    • Apollonius
      November 6, 2016

      Also, if you don’t mind a change of subject, what is your opinion on voting?

      I am sick of being lectured by the most obtuse ignoramuses about my refusal to vote in the presidential election. It never ceases to amaze me how much energy people can find for the most insipid non-issues, but they’ll roll their eyes or stare blankly if you mention anything that wasn’t on Fox News or CNN.

      Liked by 1 person

      • icareviews
        November 6, 2016

        I’ve never voted and probably never will. There may be some value in it at the local level, but I consider it a complete waste of time in national elections. The leadership at that level is so corrupt that people are really unable to endorse any of them without having blood on their hands. I don’t even pretend to know whether or not the votes are counted. The historian Donald Jeffries was discussing that with Tim Kelly on Our Interesting Times a while back. He says he always goes through the motions of the process even though he doesn’t really believe in it. I might have voted for Trump when I was 18, but it just seems like a misuse of time when I could just as productively be picking my nose. A lot of people will tell you to vote Green or Libertarian as a protest vote, but that’s been going on for decades with no perceptible impact on the two major parties’ platforms. I think there may be some value in infiltrating the party machines, since, without those infrastructures, there’s really no way to get on a ballot or get exposure for a candidacy. It would be great to have people on the inside of those party machines just to have access to names and addresses and money channels, as well.

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      • Apollonius
        November 7, 2016

        i very much agree with all of that.

        I was planning on voting for the Republican in my congressional district because I assumed Hillary would win, and I think that keeping the executive and legislative branches divided is a realistic and productive voting objective. There is some danger in this of course, and I only chose to do so because I expected Trump to lose; otherwise I would have stayed home. I was never going to vote in the presidential election.

        But it turns out that I won’t be voting at all because I missed the registration deadline.

        As for infiltration, there might be some promise to that tactic, but I wonder how effective it would be without an organized network of operatives, businesses, and multiple candidates on our side. You know, there is a young Texan–John Ramsey–who inherited a large fortune from his grandfather and in 2012 established a Super PAC that got two congressmen elected. He is apparently close with Ron Paul and is aligned with that brand of libertarianism. His operation is still going, and he has some political influence in the Austin area. It has both business and political wings. I would count his efforts as impressive successes for someone his age with no establishment connections. That is the kind of thing we would need.

        But there are dangers there too. Just look at what happened to Jimmy Walter.

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  2. guest
    November 3, 2016

    That famine was round two, before that there were ten times more Irish enslaved to the Americas than blacks (only around 400k blacks to the US), for the first 100 years the plantations were staffed almost exclusively by White slaves, and the center of early slave trade wasn’t even the south, it was New England! The word kidnapping even comes from the massive slave-catching initiative by the English in Scotland and Ireland, they just nabbed the poor.

    That’s why today, according to the Census, there are 34.5 million Americans who list their heritage as either primarily or partially Irish. That number is, incidentally, seven times larger than the population of Ireland itself (4.68 million). Irish is the second-most common ancestry among Americans, falling just behind German.

    In fact, “black slaves would be sought directly from Africa, so that there lack of English language ability—and ability to understand one another’s tribal languages—might prevent their conspiring with each other and White slaves to turn on their mutual oppressors” to quote James LaFond.

    To prevent things like the Powhatan uprising in Virginia where “White runaways banded together with Indians to wipe out the plantations in 1622-23, coming close to success. The war that crowns this period, Bacon’s Rebellion in 1676, in which White renegades, White slaves, and black slaves, allied against colonial officials, the plantation owners, Indian tribes and even pirates, in a knock down drag out fight which resulted in the burning of Jamestown, also came close to victory for the rebels.” again LaFond, whom blogi highly recommend, he is from Bodymore and blogs daily about his fun interactions your model minority. Sad stuff like Mandy, Alone – Cast Adrift in Harm City on White Wednesday.

    Liked by 1 person

    • bob saffron
      November 3, 2016

      That’s fascinating about Powhatan. I’ll check out the blog you recommend. Thanks.

      Like

    • Apollonius
      November 5, 2016

      Yes, that is fascinating. It is amazing to think of how many disparate groups were united by hatred of the English oppressors.

      Now, I don’t mean to stir up trouble, but the English did many shameful and terrible things to many peoples in pursuit of their own avarice and often on behalf of Jews.

      The Irish Holocaust is sadly not the only “holocaust” perpetrated by the English–not even in the 19th century. “Late Victorian Holocausts” by Mike Davis is a very good book on this subject.

      We should not forget that the first concentration camps were built by English mass murderers to annihilate White Boer women and children in South Africa. Millions of Indians perished in essentially engineered famines before the 20th Century. Half a million Greeks starved to death in the winter of 1941-42 because the English refused to admit Red Cross relief. The English also imposed a “starvation blockade” on Germany AFTER her surrender in 1919 to force acquiescence to the Versailles Treaty. And of course, a literal holocaust of innocent Germans (again, mostly women and children) was perpetrated by the English and Americans in Dresden in 1945.

      The English must accept part of the blame for these crimes, as they allowed themselves to be pawns and tools of the Jews and globalists in perpetrating them. If we’re being honest, they have a lot to answer for. I don’t blame people, even today, for resenting the Anglo-American Establishment, or what’s left of it. Europa as a whole is on the verge of destruction because of it. The English had their chance; they blew it. The future does not belong to them.

      I would ask Churchill, “Was it worth it?”

      Liked by 1 person

      • icareviews
        November 5, 2016

        As an adolescent, I was fond of movies about Europeans fighting in far-off places – Beau Geste, Lives of a Bengal Lancer, Lost Patrol, Gunga Din, Lawrence of Arabia, and things like that – but I now realize that such glamorized portrayals of exotic expeditionary forces, while entertaining, only promote positive feelings about imperial ventures and wars for corporate interests. I would, however, like to stress that we should ultimately hold the planners of such enterprises accountable rather than the common dupes who are misled into such undertakings – except, of course, where people are individually responsible for acts of atrocity. Nothing convinces me that the English people are innately imperialistic or evil, however, and I feel no guilt whatsoever for having English blood flowing in my veins – nor should anybody else.

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      • bob saffron
        November 5, 2016

        Millions died in famines brought about by policies instituted by the Crown and British commercial interests (under Royal sanction) in India. Churchill’s score was around of four million victims (British estimates). More a Holodomor than a Holocaust.
        http://www.samarthbharat.com/bengalholocaust.htm

        Liked by 1 person

      • Apollonius
        November 6, 2016

        I don’t think that the English are innately evil, and I certainly don’t think that they should feel ashamed about being English at all. Some of the greatest men in history–my personal heros like Issac Newton and George Orwell–were Englishmen.

        But within the English psyche, I feel that there is a kind of contradiction: The English can be pioneers and dreamers and visionaries, but never wholeheartedly. There seems to be something deep down that induces ambiguity and retreat from the greatest plunges into the deep. So, the English revert to what they think know best–usually mercantile and materialistic realms–and eschew the mystical realm that, for instance, the Germans explored without restraint. I believe that this spiritual ambiguity made the English more susceptible to Jewish subversion and corruption throughout history. The historical record is clear on the regrettable English-Jewish unholy alliance as I mentioned. Why should this have been have been possible? I believe it was this spiritual weakness.

        And though it is unpleasant to admit, there is a degree of shame that goes with these crimes that must be acknowledged. An English soldier Victor Gregg who survived the Dresden Bombing as a POW held by Germany said that that atrocity “is a stain upon the name Englishman that only an apology made in full public view would suffice to obliterate”.

        https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/feb/15/bombing-dresden-war-crime

        I don’t think ordinary English people have to apologize for it, but they should acknowledge it and show much more humility towards the rest of the world than they have. Their ancestors brought a lot of pain to a lot of innocent people–unintentionally perhaps in the case of common foot-soldiers, but still it was done.

        But of course, you are right that true, unequivocal GUILT lies with the planners and not the lackeys. And of course, with the Jews wherever they are despicably involved.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. kerberos616
    November 3, 2016

    Reblogged this on Kerberos616.

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  4. bob saffron
    November 3, 2016

    https://mises.org/library/what-caused-irish-potato-famine

    I’ll watch the video later. The institutional settings and land ownership are key to understanding how the event occurred.

    Like

  5. guest
    November 7, 2016

    I don’t really care about the English per se, i look at this purely as ammo to counter the White guilt narrative in the U.S., which is your greatest enemy, and THE beast to slay, a roadblock to be removed.

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  6. Pingback: November Third Is Irish Holocaust Remembrance Day | Hipster Racist

  7. Hipster Racist
    November 9, 2016

    Did the English do anything every other imperial power hadn’t done?

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    • icareviews
      November 9, 2016

      Probably not; but, being English, they had to go and commit genocide in rather a thoroughgoing fashion. I didn’t post this to shame the English, but because I don’t happen to be a fan of empire or murder cover-ups, which is what we’re perpetrating if we claim these people all died just because of some natural event like a crop failure.

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    • Apollonius
      November 9, 2016

      The French, Spanish, and Dutch were much more benign generally than the English were in their impacts on the subject peoples (with the exception of the Aztec depopulation and perhaps the Belgian Congo). Certainly, I am aware of no other artificial famines in colonial times such as mentioned here besides those perpetrated by the English.

      And worse, the English committed more than a few atrocities against other Europeans. No other European colonial empire had as detrimental an impact on European people as a whole.

      Like

  8. fuhrerious88
    November 13, 2016

    Reblogged this on Remember The 14 Words .

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