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Pop Goes the Culture into Atomization

“Unique to this island,” writes Sam Knee in the introduction to his book The Bag I’m In: Underground Music and Fashion in Britain 1960-1990, “the music and fashion scenes are ingrained in the UK’s DNA, going hand in hand as an inseparable force of nature that shapes our lives and the society we exist in.” “Why and how music youth scenes reach such a level of diversity and focused intensity in Britain,” Knee continues, “is a side effect of island culture and the distinctive class system in this country.” Here, in the opening lines of his text, Knee has already confused himself. Still, he stumbles onward:

By and large, British music scenes are working and middle class in origin. The upper classes don’t have the regionality or subversive sartorial suss to create such subtle nuances. The seeds of the scenes originate in the generic state school system; secondary moderns, comprehensives and grammar schools – where kids exist on a street level around other kids and cultures in the great mishmash of society that makes up Britain.

bagiminsid

Grassroots expressions of British “DNA”

Such “subtle nuances” as those ranging “from the hell bent leatherboys to the continentalist mods, into proto-skinhead scenes, through the LSD landscapes of the late-‘60s and into uncharted space rock and soulboy terrain” somehow manage to be both a “force of nature” and a matter of “DNA” as well as a product of a man-made class system. Mod style, meanwhile, manages simultaneously to be “continentalist” and “a side effect of island culture”. For Knee, as for most superficial individuals, history – at least the important stuff – does not begin until the advent of pop culture. Consequently, he believes that Britons’ archetypal potentialities failed to actualize until the twentieth century allowed them to fly their assortment of garish freak flags.

There is an unintended irony to Knee’s characterization of British youths being “in” a “bag” – i.e., safely contained within their consumerist identity. The purchases – of, for instance, a punk’s button-punctured jacket or a Sex Pistols T-shirt or the psychoactive fashions associated with psychedelic experience – were made by young English people of middle or working class background, and the styles are therefore assumed by Knee to have been of middle or working class English origin. What could the rich and powerful possibly have to do with the popular couture and concomitant musical tastes? Surely ted culture, mod, space rock, glam, punk, and each of the other sensibilities profiled by Knee were grassroots developments with no assistance from television, radio, or publications like Rave, Melody Maker, and NME. These were wild, spontaneous things born out of a spirit of youth rebellion!

Knee gives the game away when he reveals that mod’s “trailblazers” were “switched on, working class [sic], London-based Jewish kids with […] connections in the garment industry” and then goes on to describe, unwittingly, the obvious profit motive underlying this “ultimate youth scene”:

bagimin

Sam Knee’s book The Bag I’m In misrepresents a series of alien cultural importations as manifestations of an inherently British “scene” culture.

Sartorial elitism verged on fanaticism; exotically sleek, continentalist, New Wave-inspired, tailored silhouettes, worn at times in combination with the relaxed, leisurely, modern, jazzy conservatism of the penny-loafered American Ivy League was where it was at, depending on what day of the week it was. Mod was all about the now and the new; styles went in and out at a purple heart frenzy, and one-upmanship was par for the course to achieve Face status. As a result, it was an expensive pursuit, especially given that it was a very young scene (people over the age of 20 were generally considered past their peak). Young mods suffered 9 to 5 drudgery in lowly positions to earn the cash for new gear to show off at the weekend. They splurged on tailor-made or off-the-peg items from obscure backstreet retail establishments “up west”, or from costly boutiques such as Austin’s in Shaftesbury Avenue, who specialised in the new American look or, post 1965, from the Ivy Shop in Richmond.

Mods dug authentic R&B and soul, and for many, the obsession with new, obscure records almost rivalled the obsession with clothes. The Sue label, run by R&B missionary and DJ guru, Guy Stevens, released a slew of hard-to-obtain American tracks, and became the purist mod label. Progressively stylish record sleeve designs from US jazz labels Blue Note and Prestige offered a glimpse of American modernity, further influencing the scene.2

So much for scenesterism being “ingrained in the UK’s DNA”. Mod and all of the variations that followed boiled down to a scheme to get gullible kids with modest wages to throw their money away on as many bizarre new threads as possible. Earlier this year, London’s Jewish Museum debuted an exhibit titled “Moses, Mods and Mr. Fish: The Menswear Revolution”, spotlighting Jewish influence on fashions in twentieth century Britain. As Shiryn Ghermezian of The Algemeiner indicates, the revolution was also a means of turning the young against the old:

jagger

Mick Jagger makes a fashion statement.

Menswear changed most radically in the years after World War II and Jewish designers continued to stay at the forefront of up-and-coming fashion trends. The post-war period featured “young men [who] stopped dressing like their fathers, becoming detail-obsessed mods or flamboyant peacocks,” according to the Jewish Museum.

After the war, Britain saw the emergence of the mod movement and a fashion revolution that put Carnaby Street in London on the map. The strip became home to a number of innovative stores, such as Irvine Sellar’s, pioneering unisex chain Mates and the vintage-styled I Was Lord Kitchener’s Valet, opened by Robert Orbach.

“In the sixties we see this real explosion of color and there’s this temptation to think this was very new, very different, but of course, back to the 18th century, men were wearing bright and colorful clothing,” Selby said. [It must be noted, however, that the sartorial ostentation of the Enlightenment era was hardly being mass-marketed with a focus on the country’s wage laborers.] “What’s really interesting to see is just how influential Jewish designers were in setting the trends, many of which continue into today’s fashion.”

Among the items on display at the exhibit is a brown suede Cecil Gee jacket worn by John Lennon in 1963, a mod suit worn by Harry Bilgorri in 1966 and a “kipper tie,” designed by Michael Fish, who was popular among young aristocrats and celebrities, including David Bowie and Mick Jagger.3

Renegade musicologist Dr. Hans Utter explains that “with music, we have really one of the ideal and most powerful means of social manipulation and control, as well as an ideal means of […] liberation, of creating group solidarity; so, just as much as the power can be used negatively, it has a very positive force, but it’s very important to contextualize and really understand all these interlocking elements and how they operate together.” Utter elaborates:

So if you use a dynamic macrosociological perspective, what that means is you’re looking at the society as being something that’s constantly in flux, constantly in motion; but it’s also not based just on unification, but it’s also based on conflict. It’s based on group identity and divisions between groups, right? So you have consensus and conflict, so within […] the use of music but also within society itself, you have consensus, you know, people moving towards a particular perspective, and you have conflict within specific groups or specific movements to the society as a whole. Music also, within this dynamic model, is very useful for social cohesion, and this is something we can see in primitive tribal societies. We can see this in [our own culture as well], just walk out of your door and look around and [see] the kids with their identities, right? And social cohesion is very important in creating and defining social divisions, classes, subcultures, as well as propagating and enforcing ideologies.

hans-utter

Dr. Hans Utter

“So what you’re getting at,” interjects Gnostic Media interviewer Jan Irvin, “is like, okay, there was the acid rock of the 60s, early 70s, then we get the hard rock, the Ozzy Osbourne, the Black Sabbath and all of that stuff, and then in the early 80s out comes the new wave movement, and then in the 2000s they come out with the emo music, etc., so […] would those create subdivisions within the culture? […] I do remember in high school, in fact, each of the groups of students was pretty much divided by what type of music they listened to.”

“Exactly. That’s exactly correct,” Dr. Utter confirms, going on to explain how this was accomplished with deliberate intentions:

In fact […] we’ll see how this is actually […] planned, the idea of creating specific manipulable units of society, right? So it’s much easier to manipulate a particular group and it’s easy once you can define the parameters of that group’s experience, then you can just sort of sit there behind the scenes and, you know, flip switches, so to speak. Of course, it’s more complicated than that […] In America, you used to have concert programs, you know, in the nineteenth century, where you’d have a folk song, an operetta, you’d have some type of a dance piece, all in one concert program; but as America’s social and class definitions became much more solidified, the higher culture was sort of reserved for the new developing economic and cultural elites and this was a way to define their culture, and you no longer had these sort of fluid programs […] and this also mirrored the more fluid nature of American society. But, for example, once you have someone defining themselves as part of a specific subculture, they are going to be brought into the broader ideology, so to speak, of that subculture and [it] will actually help and shape and form their identity at the same time it’s creating a group division. If you look at punk rockers and metalheads, even there you take a certain type of music, suddenly you create divisions between people, right? You’re creating social division […] as well as you’re creating in-group cohesion through that […]4

who

The Who were the quintessential mods.

Mick Farren, a member of the psych band the Deviants, brings out the destructive and violently divisive nature of the pop subcultures rocking Britain during the 1960s.

The conflict between the English mods and rockers […] wasn’t a matter of class at all. Both groups were working-class kids from the same streets, the same schools and the same backgrounds. On average, the rockers might have been a couple of years older but beyond that there was no demographic separation. The battle was one of pure attitude and pure style. The second wave of youth culture was in physical combat with the first, its own version of the Neanderthals and Cro-Magnons. In one corner you had the mods – haircuts, mohair and Motown music; smart and slick. They took to amphetamines and became obsessional on the subject of street fashion. In the other, there were the rockers – jeans, boots and a leather jacket, a motorcycle even; stubborn and dirty, they were fixed in the belief that rock died with Buddy Holly. The mods, with vicious pillhead logic, decided that the rockers should be exterminated because they were out of date.

mick-farren

Mick Farren photographed close to the end of his far-out journey.

At the root of the clash was a basic mod premise that the rockers had bought a very dumb portion of the consumer myth. The mods hadn’t seen the young Elvis Presley, they’d only seen [1961’s] Blue Hawaii and they were deeply suspicious of the entire deal. Sure it might be great to have all this cheap, disposable stuff, but they were well aware that it was only bought with squirrel cage jobs; stockboy, mailroom, store clerk. They didn’t need Bob Dylan to tell them that a job was being done on them by society’s pliers. The rockers, on the other hand, were massive traditionalists. They’d taken to the black leather jacket, the blue jeans and the motorcycle. They liked them and saw no reason to give them up just because some new fad had come along. As far as the rockers were concerned, what was good enough for 1953 was also good enough for 1963. It was this philosophy that caused the mods to hate the rockers worse than the rest of regular society. The rockers were ponderous kids resisting change. The mod stood for constant evolution; hating rockers was worthwhile. They were easily identifiable, easily accessible and just as prone to violence. It was possible that this was the world’s first consumer war, the street politics of plenty.

Fortunately, styles in both politics and drugs changed before genocide could actually take place. By the start of 1967, the mods were already schisming into two distinct groups. The bright and trendsetting were experimenting with psychedelics, easing paisley and William Morris into their fashion schemes and wondering if there might be a percentage in joining up with the hippies for the duration. The remainder – the ones with the real need for hate – were busy shaving off their hair, buying heavy boots and inventing the sub-group that would eventually be known as skinheads. One of the saving graces of the sixties was that things moved so quickly that there was never any time for root fascism to form a united front. Fascism was left to the authorities.5

mick-farren-young

Mick Farren in earlier days – looking slightly more photogenic?

There is at once much perception and much blindness in Farren’s account of the competing sensibilities. He appears to completely miss the fact that the mods were themselves the prime exemplars of the empty consumerism that he suggests was a rocker trait that the mods held in contempt. There is, however, value in Farren’s insight that, from a demographic perspective, mods and rockers might just as well have comprised one group of people. Manufactured pop fads in pharmaceuticals, music, and clothing were ultimately the cause of much of the pointless social tension. Britons, divided by design, were kept preoccupied and addled by all of the new products, behaviors, and hedonistic lifestyles displayed in the shop windows and the television screens of the postwar globalist order. As Farren indicates, the “saving grace” of such a system is that “there was never any time for root fascism” – by which, of course, he means nationalism and ethnic solidarity – “to form a united front” against the coming predatory dystopia.

Rainer Chlodwig von K.

Endnotes

  1. Knee, Sam. The Bag I’m In: Underground Music and Fashion in Britain 1960-1990. London: Cicada Books, 2015, p. 9.
  2. Ibid., p. 31.
  3. Ghermezian, Shiryn. “London Exhibit Displays Jewish Tailors Behind Men’s Fashion Industry”. The Algemeiner (April 17, 2016): https://www.algemeiner.com/2016/04/17/london-exhibit-displays-jewish-tailors-behind-mens-fashion-industry/
  4. Irvin, Jan. “Music, Mind Control and Psychobiology, Part 1”. Gnostic Media ep. 232 (June 21, 2015): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1n5Hfy_dCg
  5. Farren, Mick. The Black Leather Jacket. London: Plexus, 2008, pp. 54-56.
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About icareviews

Propaganda Minister of #AryanSkynet

35 comments on “Pop Goes the Culture into Atomization

  1. icareviews
    October 2, 2016

    Reblogged this on icareviews.

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  2. kerberos616
    October 2, 2016

    Reblogged this on Kerberos616.

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  3. Pingback: Pop Goes the Culture into Atomization | Hipster Racist

  4. Don Logan
    October 2, 2016

    Good article. The group division is beneficial to the elites but I wouldn’t characterize that as the overriding objective of emerging new trends, not that you did. The quote about the Jews inventing mod fashions is interesting and the first time I’ve encountered that. It may well be true, but, particularly with the Jewish publication piece, Jews love to exaggerate their influence on those things they consider are valuable. Einstein is a classic example of them inflating someone who had worthier predecessors. Of course, the record industry and publishing industry was always top-heavy with Jews.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hipster Racist
      October 2, 2016

      Mostly it seems like good old fashioned capitalism to me. The working classes has some disposable income for the first time and the industrial revolution had matured to the point where people could buy clothes as a semi-luxury item. Also good point about Einstein – Einstein actually contributed to his field (unlike Freud) but he became a media celebrity precisely because he was a member of a certain tribe. The “Guru Effect” as MacDonald calls it, essentially, secular rabbis.

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      • icareviews
        October 2, 2016

        If you look at that old newsreel titled “Whitsun Playtime”, though, I can’t quite dismiss a sneaking suspicion that some of that brawling might have been staged for the cameras. I’m not saying all the kids were crisis actors, but this mods vs. rockers business got a lot of press and exposure as something that kids liked to do on weekends, almost like the media really wanted to promote the riots.

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  5. Hipster Racist
    October 2, 2016

    Also, nice quotes from Jan Irvin and Dr. Hans Utter, who I have posted on my blog before. They have done some very interesting interviews with Joseph Atwill. Great stuff about the history of “mind control” and “weaponizing anthropology.”

    Liked by 1 person

  6. ct
    October 3, 2016

    I did not have the time yet to listen to Dr. Hans Utter yet. Maybe he is covering this all along, maybe not.
    We know the promotion makes a trend, so it is with music as well. The promoters would be silly not to use it. Today we have glaring proof with rap and all the degeneracy pushed on our youth and everyone by the (((record companies))).
    Let me state what I came to understand about “rock music”. I listened to “rock” most of my youth until I dropped it for good. (I did not know better until I figured it out)
    The term derives from a slang word used by Blacks, hinting at sexual intercourse. To “rock’n roll” was used in that sense.

    The rock rhythm is repetitive, 4/4 rhythm. It beats the soul down, its repetition makes the mind dull and receptive for messages. It is stuffed with screaming, groaning, crying, desperation, anger, aggression, hate and debasing utterances. The tendency depending on the genre of course.
    But in its essence it is dominated by the dulling, battering rhythm of repetitive 4/4 rhythm. This rhythm is rather alien to european’s souls. It’s rather negroid than european and it is hitting ON the soul down, instead of … (later). Add the guitars, their sound is often or mostly unclear and distorted on purpose.

    Don’t get me wrong. There is some great rock songs and Whites have refined rock music up to impressive art rock/art metal of recent years. But most of these great songs are composed more towards the style of a hymn, our ancient european superior musical form. Stairway to heaven comes to mind, the only annoying part in this piece is the stupid rhythm dominated part where they thought need to insert brutish numbing rock elements. But most of rock is trash, even a Led Zepp album is hard to listen to, because it is such thrash.
    I came to contact with rock at very early age of 6 years or so. It was Heavy Metal and I know quite a bit about the trash that is rock music and its effects on mind and soul.
    So the battering, screaming, brutish rock music is hitting us down in contrast to the elevating movement of subtle and original european soundscapes. The hymn and symphony being the opposite. It is speaking to our most fine and noble sentiments and qualities, elevating us to spheres of purity and clarity of emotion and sensitivity. Rock in general does the opposite, speaking and hammering down on us, pulling our most base and brutish, desperate sentiments and qualities. If it was not developed as a psyop, it sure was pushed like it was one. How ugly was the emerging “rock” music culture, full of screaming, groaning, vile freaks, showing their most base and primitive sides and urges to mass audiences and get superstar status for it. Add the drugs and it’s a toxic receipt for a degeneracy movement.

    If anyone is interested in an original approach to music, I strongly recommend Arthur Schopenhauer’s treatment of music, just search for “on metaphysics of music” with his name on the web. Also the musicologist Dr. Klaus Mehling has published on this matter and argues in similar ways to mine above, namely that rock/rap and such is stimulating youth to violence and primitive behaviour.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hipster Racist
      October 3, 2016

      Nah, most rock music is English/Welsh/Scottish folk music with electric guitars (an invention of the White man.) I’m pro-White, that doesn’t mean I’m Tipper Gore or some Pentecostal Preacher talking about how if you play Led Zeppelin backwards it says “Praise Satan.”

      And I may be in the minority here, but I just roll my eyes when people talk about “degeneracy.” People like getting in on – white people too! Sex isn’t just for black people. You’ve heard the joke, right? Why are Baptists against fornication? Because it may lead to dancing!

      I love classical and even hymns and I’ll always have a place in my heart for the twangiest of bluegrass (another folk music from the Scottish highlands.)

      But if loving AC/DC is wrong, I don’t wanna be right.

      Like

      • icareviews
        October 3, 2016

        I’d like to know where our Welsh, Scottish, and British heritage fits into this one. Sounds more like an ancient Greek jam to me:

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      • Hipster Racist
        October 3, 2016

        Reminds me of this:

        But you gonna tell me this isn’t white music?

        I dunno but I do know that AC/DC (and Led Zeppelin for that matter, along with Pink Floyd and even Radiohead) are pretty much basic British (i.e., English, Scottish and Welsh) folk music with electric guitars – the modern electric guitar, of course, being basically invented by a white man.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Les_Paul#Guitar_builder

        Also, the pentatonic scale is common in British folk music which is where rock and roll got it from:

        Speed this up and add some distortion and you’d have rock and roll:

        Then there’s this:

        or this:

        Look – I could do this all day, it’s my hobby:

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      • icareviews
        October 3, 2016

        People of course are disingenuously over-simplifying when they say that whites stole rock from blacks. Clearly, there was cross-pollination. At the same time, though, it’s just as wrong to pretend that whites made it all happen themselves. Without American blacks there would have been no Elvis Presley, Mick Jagger, or Jimmy Page. I’m a classic rock fan myself, so I’m not saying people ought to throw it all out; but I do tend to think it has redirected people in destructive ways as Utter and Irvin suggest is very possible in their “Music, Mind Control and Psychobiology” series.

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      • Sam J.
        October 12, 2016

        If you like the Greek music I bet you’ll like this. It’s Yugoslavian\Serbian from the movie “The Underground”. I beseech you people to watch this movie it’s very good. A comedy, sorta. It’s also a commentary on our perception of the truth.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underground_%281995_film%29

        Music from film.

        I like some Greek music. Here’s some tunes I have saved.

        I know Black people didn’t invent this.

        Like

    • Hipster Racist
      October 3, 2016

      4/4 rhythm. This rhythm is rather alien to european’s souls. It’s rather negroid than european

      This is simply false – there is nothing at all “negroid” about 4/4 – in fact, Africa is known for its polyrhythm – for instance:

      All of the best black music from America came from slaves aping European folk music and bending the third and adding “swing” (“swing” simply means lengthening the second beat somewhat.) In fact, it’s a typical “we was kangs” myth that Amazing Grace was based on a melody stolen from a slave and turned into a hymn – as if the English author needed to learn the pentatonic scale from an African! Absurd.

      And as far as common time/4/4 – it’s certainly a shame that 3/4 (and even 5/4) has all but been lost in popular music, but there is nothing at all foreign about 4/4 time.

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  7. Hipster Racist
    October 3, 2016

    I do tend to think it has redirected people in destructive ways

    Everything you are complaining about is a product of mass media – in this case, the radio. Blacks originated nothing – Elvis was nothing but a white man covering black musicians who were covering white musicians.

    The radio was, of course, one way mass media – it destroyed local music cultures by picking and choosing and turning certain styles and songs into national hits. The problem wasn’t the content per se, it was the fact that it was centralized – and in the hands of the (((hostile elite.)))

    FFS, you can find bawdy lyrics in medieval madrigals. Puritanism comes from the English discovering the Old Testament (i.e., Judaism) and its anti-sex and anti-women attitudes. The elites of England – as well as the common people – were never Puritans – that was strictly a middle class phenomenon (i.e., (((merchants))) and their political allies) influenced by the Hebrew scriptures, that found all “pagan” (i.e., folk) customs “sexual” and “obscene.” These are the people that wanted to ban folk dancing.

    Even the hardcore Catholic moralist E. Michael Jones recognizes this:

    You guys really make me miss the old community that was thankfully untouched by the neo-puritanism that has re-infected the pro-white movement. All this talk of “degeneracy” sounds like the reincarnation of Jimmy Swaggart or something.

    It’s only a matter of time before the (((Daily Stormer))) starts demanding women start wearing a burka or something. You know, nudism is European – covering the body is a Middle Eastern thing. It should be obvious why – in the hot desert sun you have to cover up – in northern Europe, you have to strip down every summer to get your vitamin D.

    Sorry – I refuse to concede sex to non-whites.

    Like

    • Hipster Racist
      October 4, 2016

      Dr. Hans Utter on mass media leading to the mass mind and mass culture.

      The medium *is* the message.

      If you a distracted by the titillation – that’s the point. While you are following the shiny object/sexy ladies, they are picking your pocket.

      Like

      • guest
        October 4, 2016

        That would make a great standalone post, the white origin story of rock.

        Blacks seem to dislike rock even more than classical music, example, Iron Maiden played a concert in South Africa on their recent 2016 book of souls world tour, here is an audience picture from that gig, and here another</a<, notice anything? Not one black face in the crowd, and it's an African country, 90% black! Rock festivals here in Europe are also mostly white, with the occasional Japanese tourist mixed in, they Japanese do like to rock.

        Like

      • guest
        October 4, 2016

        Here is a wider shot of the audience, and literally not one black face!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hipster Racist
        October 4, 2016

        @guest

        A classic Occidental Observer article about AC/DC

        http://www.theoccidentalobserver.net/2008/11/media-watch-implicit-whiteness-with-pyrotechnics-or-the-night-white-people-took-over-washington-dc/

        The other night I saw AC/DC at the Verizon Center in Washington, D.C. … Of the thousands of human beings packed into the arena, I did not see a single non-white face.

        The swarms of whites did not go unnoticed by the smaller crowds of blacks orbiting the Verizon Center that night. They seemed slightly alarmed by the rugged whites, many of whom sported Celtic cross tattoos, Germanic cross T-shirts, and other signs of what psychologist Kevin MacDonald calls “implicit whiteness.”

        the pro-white observer in me could not help but play field anthropologist at the same time. Here I was, in the thick of thousands of whites, all communing, if you will, around what was essentially a pagan convergence. The same folks who heaped hatred on Sarah Palin could not have been much more comfortable with this panorama: a sea of white males all thrusting their fists in the air and yelling “oi!”, and the occasional buxom white woman — probably a non-feminist — gyrating with glee.

        I am sure that conservative Christian whites would not have approved of much of it. But if we as whites are looking for what works, we should not overlook the “Viking” whites as an element of healthy, vigorous white life. They like the beer, the fighting and the sex. Properly directed, this is what a race on the survival track does.

        In considering it further, I decided that the real function of AC/DC’s music is to whip up whites for war and male fertility. Again, these aren’t bad things for a race declining in numbers and influence across the Western world. And it all operates free from the scrutiny of the SPLC and other “hate hunters”

        There is a wonderful mystery to the dark forests of our European ancestors — the sprites, the gnomes, the elves, the swords, the axes, the knights, the maidens, the witches and warlocks, the war-party bonfires. It’s a bottomless lake for the white imagination, and I am sure that an experience like an AC/DC show taps into it.

        Whatever is going on, whites show up, in large numbers, ready to rock. That’s about all we need, if you think about it.

        Like

      • guest
        October 4, 2016

        Great article, but a missed opportunity by not attaching a picture like this or that instead, because white devil, get it… Imagine thousands of whites wearing devil horns at those ACDC concerts, no wonder minos stay away, it must be a “they live” like experience for them.

        Like

      • Hipster Racist
        October 4, 2016

        Obama’s crazy black power pastor Wright – not to mention dozens of black song lyrics – explain exactly why blacks hate rock and roll music.

        It doesn’t “swing” – the meter is precise.

        Listen to an AC/DC song – the 4/4 meter is precise, like a marching band. Each beat is spaced exactly the same – it’s like a metronome, or a clock.

        Then, listen to a black band play a white rock song – they add “swing” – the pause between beats 2 and 3 is a little bit longer than the pause between beats 1/2 and 3/4.

        The metal subgenre of rock, especially, has a very precise meter.

        And yeah – American blacks are Christianized, of course. Much of the “satanic” stuff in rock/metal – other than the Crowley nonsense, which has its own spooky history behind it – was either just to piss of their parents, or not really “satanic” at all, but basically a resurgence of folk/paganism.

        And that Euro-pagan stuff scares the shit out of blacks – for good reason.

        Like

    • icareviews
      October 4, 2016

      I don’t know if you’re aware, but you have a tendency to misrepresent people’s statements in order to paint them or their ideas in an unfavorable light. I’ve never objected to sex or sexual content, and I don’t think girls should be stoned to death for having premarital sex; but there’s a big difference between some medieval song about drinking and dalliance and the Ramones singing “now I wanna sniff some glue” or Ted Nugent talking about getting a woman into a stanglehold.

      Like

  8. Sam J.
    October 5, 2016

    Ah someone who likes bluegrass, blues, AC-DC and the Stooges. You should see my record collection. Lots of Metal and also stuff like Hoyt Axton, Hank Williams Jr, lots of surf. I have all kinds of stuff. Not much on Jazz.

    I’ve seen AC-DC more than any other band in concert and used to listen to way too much along with Judas Priest.

    Like

  9. Apollonius
    October 5, 2016

    This article was great. One can discern very fundamental cultural trends if the state of music is analyzed properly. Musical fashions and practices can be very revealing, much more so than politics or even cinema.

    I’ve always found it interesting that America never had any kind of “classical” culture, and thus originated various extremes of musical development. This fragmentation was reflected in many aspects of American civilization besides the music. Just one example would be American Christianity (Protestants AND Catholics too unfortunately) vs Old-World European Christianity. You’ll learn everything you’ll ever need to know about American Christianity by listening to Schubert’s “Ave Maria” and then to “How Great is Our God”. You might even want to throw in some “Gospel” rap (LOL!) to intensify the affect.

    I’m sure everyone here remembers the old Rothschild quote…Well it really should’ve been:

    “Let me make a nation’s music, and I care not who makes it’s laws”

    Liked by 2 people

    • icareviews
      October 6, 2016

      There was a movement to create a quintessentially American classical music in the twentieth century, but I don’t know very much about it, and the examples I’ve heard never really spoke to me. It makes more sense that a nation that formed its identity as a pioneering republic or democracy with no official aristocracy would have a more robust popular tradition.

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      • Apollonius
        October 6, 2016

        Yes, you could put it that way. Though, I would say that American music is defined by its LACK of real tradition, which explains the profusion of various different and contradictory styles and movements.

        I think Evola put it best when he said:

        “In a society which has ‘started from scratch’, everything has the characteristic of being fabricated.”

        This describes American “culture” quite well.

        I didn’t know that there was a movement to make an “American” classical music, but I’m not surprised that it failed. It could only have been a vacuous imitation of the real thing. Interestingly, that is also what they say about Mendelssohn and Mahler.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. robertpinkerton
    October 5, 2016

    It has been a long time since last I read Plato:I considered him a totalitarian on account of impressions of the Republic, Laws, and Statesman. But did he not recommend careful censorship of music?

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    • Apollonius
      October 6, 2016

      Indeed, he did.

      “This is the point to which, above all, the attention of our rulers should be directed, –that music and gymnastic be preserved in their original form, and no innovation made. They must do their utmost to maintain them intact. And when any one says that mankind most regard, “The newest song which the singers have,” they will be afraid that he may be praising, not new songs, but a new kind of song; and this ought not to be praised, or conceived to be the meaning of the poet; for any musical innovation is full of danger to the whole State, and ought to be prohibited. So Damon tells me, and I can quite believe him; he says that when modes of music change, of the State always change with them.”

      This is from the Republic, as you might recall. His concern was very specific, moreover; he wanted the actual rhythmic patterns of music to be carefully and wisely formed and maintained, and he regarded changes towards “disorderly” or dissonant patterns to be a danger. It wasn’t just lyrics or themes that mattered. Presumably, Plato would have had no problems with sexual content in good taste and, most importantly, in the right musical mode.

      So, all of the past 150 years in music would be offensive to his sensibilities. But look at what has happened in that time. He was probably right…

      He describes here the progression of a hypothetical cultural decline initiated by a change in music:

      “Then, I said, our guardians must lay the foundations of their fortress in music?

      Yes, he said; the lawlessness of which you speak too easily steals in.
      Yes, I replied, in the form of amusement; and at first sight it appears harmless.

      Why, yes, he said, and there is no harm; were it not that little by little this spirit of licence, finding a home, imperceptibly penetrates into manners and customs; whence, issuing with greater force, it invades contracts between man and man, and from contracts goes on to laws and constitutions, in utter recklessness, ending at last, Socrates, by an overthrow of all rights, private as well as public.”

      Sound familiar?

      Liked by 1 person

  11. guest
    October 6, 2016

    Speaking of culture, there is another brown scare going on in Germany, so called völkisch settlers are apparently all nazis! Raciss white people moving to the country side, running bio farms and having large families, how evil! You want to be self sufficient, you may just as well draw a swastika on your forehead. It’s really bad, they are even maintaining Germanic traditions and customs! Minding your own bio business is now also racist.

    The headlines are all:
    Völkisch settlers – the bio nazis from next door
    Völkisch settlers – nice landscape with brown spots
    On the surface exemplary, internally right wing radical

    They say it’s an Artaman League type thing, which was a German agrarian and völkisch movement dedicated to a Blood and soil-inspired ruralism, eventually absorbed by, the Nazi Party. Further from the Wikipedia entry on Artaman:

    The development of a number of environmentalist groups and projects in Germany with extreme right wing politics has recently gained media attention. Since the 1990s, far-right environmentalists have taken advantage of cheap farmland made available by the post-Cold War reunification of East and West Germany, establishing themselves in Mecklenburg, “in an effort to reinvigorate the traditions of the Artman League”.

    Like

  12. weeedwacker
    October 6, 2016

    It’s embarrassing as hell remembering what I was into and many of the people I hung out with and the cheesy places we went for entertainment back when I was in my teens. In the back of my mind I always knew it was corny and stupid, but what confused me was how important it all seemed to other people my own age, so, naturally I always assumed the problem was with me since all this counter cultural stuff was so much larger than I was.
    I didn’t realize it at the time but I think part of me sensed the jewishness lurking behind it all. I couldn’t see what about it all disturbed me so much, but I think I was aware of how we were being manipulated, and that it was just to separate us from our money made it all the more mean and petty.
    Also, although it wasn’t that noticeable at that time, I was uncomfortably aware of the genocidal specter of political correctness forming over the whole scene.
    Most of the people I thought were so cool back then are now pathetic husks, grotesque caricatures of themselves.
    Working against your own best interests takes it’s toll spiritually.
    Good morning!

    Liked by 1 person

    • icareviews
      October 6, 2016

      I think I remember you writing something negative about David McGowan on one of your blogs; but I’ve actually come to have an appreciation of his thought. If you enjoy the sorts of information I bring out in this article, you might also want to check out some of his articles or interviews, which use the history of the music business to draw way more far-out conclusions.

      Like

      • weeedwacker
        October 9, 2016

        Maybe I’ll get around to reading his book on the Laurel Canyon music scene and hope it doesn’t make me homesick, but I’ve always wondered about these musicians who write songs about catastrophes the Govt has planned, or directors who put hints concerning future crisi on their films.
        I mean, does some man in black show up at the recording studio and give them the lyrics they want them to put in their songs accompanied by either threats to family members if they don’t or promises of any kind of weird orgy they want if they comply?
        Or are these artists under some kind of weird mind control when they do their creative work?
        Does anybody know of any gallery artists or syndicated comic strips that put these weird warnings in their work?

        Liked by 1 person

      • icareviews
        October 9, 2016

        I don’t pretend to know; but I’ve always remembered something strange that I saw in a documentary that was included on the Blu-ray for one of the Kick-Ass films. It was about the mixing of the soundtrack to the film, and what was weird was that in the background, in the studio where the soundtrack was being put together, there was a man in the background whose face had been blurred. It really made me curious about who that was and why he didn’t want to be seen there.

        Liked by 1 person

      • weeedwacker
        October 14, 2016

        Netanyahu!!

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Pingback: Manufactured Music and Deep State Rites: Rainer Raps with Nick on Circus Maximus 10/7/16 | Aryan Skynet

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